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Which Mef Is Based Out Of Camp Lejeune North Carolina?

Quick Answer

Camp Lejeune, located in North Carolina, is home to the II Marine Expeditionary Force (MEF) and serves as a major Marine Corps installation. The base has been at the center of a water contamination issue since 1982, with as many as one million military and civilian staff and their families potentially exposed to contaminated drinking water. Those affected may be eligible for compensation if they meet certain criteria, and legal representation is crucial in pursuing claims.

Introduction

Camp Lejeune, located in North Carolina, is a significant Marine Corps installation that serves as the home base for various combat units and support commands. It covers an expansive area of 156,000 acres and houses important tenant commands such as II Marine Expeditionary Force (MEF), 2nd Marine Division, 2nd Marine Logistics Group, and the naval hospital.

One notable unit based out of Camp Lejeune is the II MEF. This force plays a crucial role in supporting military operations both domestically and internationally. Recently, approximately fifty U.S Marines from II MEF embarked on a deployment aboard the USNS Trenton to exercise their rapid deployment capabilities into Europe’s theater via an expeditionary fast transport ship.

However, amidst its significance as a military stronghold lies one unfortunate chapter -the water contamination issue at Camp Lejeune which has had severe consequences for many military personnel stationed there along with their families.

The purpose of this article is to shed light on this pressing matter by providing information about Camp Lejeune itself while focusing primarily on lawsuits surrounding water contamination incidents that have affected countless individuals living or working within its premises.

Camp Lejeune and the II Marine Expeditionary Force (MEF)

Camp Lejeune, located in North Carolina, is a significant military installation that serves as the home base for the II Marine Expeditionary Force (MEF) along with other combat units and support commands. Spanning over 156,000 acres of land, it houses various tenant commands including Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune itself.

The II MEF plays a crucial role as one of the major combat units stationed at Camp Lejeune. Comprised of highly trained Marines ready to respond swiftly to any crisis or conflict situation, this force ensures readiness and preparedness within its area of responsibility.

With an emphasis on expeditionary operations across all domains – air, ground, sea – the II MEF maintains constant vigilance through rigorous training exercises conducted both locally at Camp Lejeune’s extensive facilities and internationally during deployments abroad.

One notable aspect contributing to their operational effectiveness is access to diverse training resources available right on-site. These include state-of-the-art live fire ranges where Marines can hone their marksmanship skills while simulating real-world scenarios under controlled conditions. Additionally, Camp Lejeune offers specialized training areas such as urban warfare complexes designed specifically for enhancing proficiency in close-quarters battle tactics.

Furthermore, Camp Lejeune also provides ample opportunities for joint-service collaboration by hosting multinational exercises involving allied forces from around the world. This fosters interoperability among different branches of service, making them better equipped to work together seamlessly when called upon.

Overall, the combination of strategic location, size, and comprehensive training facilities make Camp Lejeune the ideal base for the II Marine Expeditionary Force. Its role as a major combat unit ensures readiness and preparedness to address any threat or conflict that may arise in its area of responsibility.

Water Contamination at Camp Lejeune

Camp Lejeune, a major Marine Corps installation located in North Carolina, faced a significant water contamination issue that came to light in 1982. It was discovered that the drinking water on the base had been contaminated with specific volatile organic compounds (VOCs), posing serious health risks to those who were exposed.

The VOCs found in the drinking water included chemicals such as trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), benzene, and vinyl chloride. These contaminants are known carcinogens and have been linked to various adverse health effects.

Unfortunately, it is estimated that as many as one million military personnel and civilian staff members along with their families may have been exposed to this contaminated water during their time at Camp Lejeune. The exposure could occur through living or working on the base for an extended period of time.

Exposure to these toxic substances can lead to severe health consequences for individuals affected by them. Some of the potential health conditions associated with exposure include:

  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Kidney cancer
  • Leukemias (including myelodysplastic syndromes)
  • Liver cancer
  • Bladder cancer
  • Non-Hodgkin lymphoma
  • Multiple myeloma
  • Kidney disease (end-stage renal disease)
  • Systemic sclerosis/scleroderma
  • Cardiac birth defects
  • Esophageal cancer
  • Male breast cancer
  • Lung cancer (if non-smoker)
  • Miscarriage
  • Hepatic steatosis (Fatty Liver Disease)
  • Female infertility
  • Neurobehavioral effects
  • Non-cardiac birth defects (eye defects, oral clefts, neural tube defects, etc.)
  • Female breast cancer
  • Cervical cancer
  • Hodgkin’s disease
  • Ovarian cancer
  • Prostate cancer
  • Rectal cancer
  • Brain cancer
  • Liver cirrhosis
  • Soft Tissue Cancer
  • Hypersensitivity Skin Disorder
  • Aplastic anemia
  • Or alternatively, individuals who have been diagnosed with another injury or serious medical condition not listed above

It is important for anyone who lived or worked at Camp Lejeune between 1953 and 1987 when there was evidence of groundwater contamination due to leaking underground storage tanks containing fuel oil, solvents, pesticides, etc., to be aware of these potential risks they might face even years after leaving Camp Lejeune.

The discovery of the water contamination at Camp Lejeune has led to numerous lawsuits and legal actions seeking compensation for those affected by the exposure. Victims who meet certain criteria set by law may be eligible for compensation if they have been diagnosed with one of the specified injuries or health conditions associated with exposure.

It is crucial that individuals who believe they were exposed to contaminated water at Camp Lejeune seek medical attention and consult a lawyer specializing in these cases as soon as possible. Legal representation can help victims navigate through complex processes, gather necessary evidence, and fight for their rights to receive appropriate compensation.

Camp Lejeune’s water contamination issue serves as a reminder of the importance of ensuring safe drinking water on military bases and protecting the well-being of service members, civilian staff, and their families from potential environmental hazards.

Lawsuits and Compensation

Victims exposed to contaminated water at Camp Lejeune may be eligible for compensation if they meet certain criteria set by law. The following is an explanation of the eligibility criteria, a list of specific injuries and health conditions that may qualify for compensation, as well as the importance of legal representation in seeking compensation.

Eligibility Criteria:

To apply for free claim review, individuals must have been diagnosed with one or more of the following injuries after exposure at Camp Lejeune:

  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Kidney cancer
  • Leukemias (all types, including myelodysplastic syndromes)
  • Liver cancer
  • Bladder cancer
  • Non-Hodgkin lymphoma
  • Multiple myeloma
  • Kidney disease (end-stage renal disease)
  • Systemic sclerosis / scleroderma
  • Cardiac birth defects
  • Esophageal Cancer
  • Male breast cancer
  • Lung Cancer (if non-smoker)
  • Miscarriage
  • Hepatic Steatosis (Fatty Liver Disease)
  • Female infertility
  • Neurobehavioral effects
  • Non-cardiac birth defects
  • Female breast cancer
  • Cervical cancer
  • Hodgkin’s disease
  • Ovarian cancer
  • Prostate cancer
  • Rectal cancer
  • Brain cancer
  • Liver cirrhosis
  • Soft Tissue Cancer
  • Hypersensitivity Skin Disorder
  • Aplastic anemia

Alternatively, individuals can also qualify if they have been diagnosed with another injury not listed above but still suffered a serious medical condition or injury due to exposure at Camp Lejeune.

Importance Of Legal Representation:

Seeking legal representation is crucial when pursuing claims related to water contamination issues at military bases like Camp Lejeune. Experienced attorneys specializing in this area understand the complexities involved and can provide valuable guidance throughout the process.

Legal representatives help victims navigate through various aspects such as gathering necessary evidence supporting their case; ensuring all required documentation is submitted accurately within specified deadlines; representing them during negotiations with responsible parties or insurance companies; and advocating for their rights to fair compensation.

Having legal representation can significantly increase the chances of a successful claim, as attorneys have in-depth knowledge of relevant laws, regulations, and precedents. They are equipped to handle any challenges that may arise during the process while protecting victims’ interests every step of the way.

Conclusion:

Victims exposed to contaminated water at Camp Lejeune deserve justice and compensation for the serious health consequences they have suffered. By meeting specific eligibility criteria outlined by law, individuals diagnosed with qualifying injuries or conditions after exposure may be eligible for compensation.

Seeking legal representation is highly recommended when pursuing claims related to this issue. Experienced attorneys specializing in these cases provide invaluable support throughout the entire process – from gathering evidence to negotiating on behalf of victims – ensuring their rights are protected and increasing their chances of obtaining fair compensation.

If you believe you qualify under these circumstances, it’s important not to delay seeking assistance due to deadlines associated with filing your case.

Frequently Asked Questions

Common questions and concerns regarding the water contamination issue at Camp Lejeune:

Q1: What is the extent of the water contamination issue at Camp Lejeune?

A1: The water contamination issue at Camp Lejeune involved specific volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in the drinking water. It is estimated that as many as one million military personnel, civilian staff, and their families may have been exposed to this contaminated water.

Q2: When was the discovery made about the contaminated drinking water?

A2: The discovery of contaminated drinking water occurred in 1982 when testing revealed high levels of VOCs present in several wells on base.

Answers to questions about eligibility for compensation, application process, and legal representation:

Q3: Who qualifies for compensation related to exposure to contaminated drinking water at Camp LeJeune?

A3: To qualify for compensation related to exposure at Camp LeJeune, individuals must meet certain criteria set by law. They must have been diagnosed with one or more injuries listed below after being exposed:

  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Kidney cancer
  • Various types of leukemia
  • Liver cancer
  • And other specified conditions such as bladder cancer, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, etc.

Alternatively, individuals can be eligible if they were diagnosed with any type of serious medical condition not mentioned above, including cancers or injuries caused due to contaminated water exposure. It should be noted that lead does not currently represent clients specifically pertaining to this matter.

Q4: How do I apply for a claim review?

A4: To apply for a free claim review, you need to visit our website Military-forces.net. There you will find an online form where you can provide your details along with relevant documents supporting your diagnosis.

Q5: Do I need legal representation while applying?

A5: No, it isn’t necessary, but having proper guidance from experienced attorneys can be beneficial in navigating the complex legal process and increasing your chances of a successful claim. It is recommended to consult with an attorney who specializes in military toxic exposure cases.

Additional information on resources and support available for affected individuals and their families:

Q6: Are there any medical or financial assistance programs available?

A6: Yes, there are several programs that provide medical care, counseling services, disability benefits, and other forms of assistance to those affected by the water contamination at Camp Lejeune. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) offers healthcare benefits specifically for veterans exposed to contaminated drinking water at Camp Lejeune.

Q7: Where can I find more information about the lawsuits surrounding Camp Lejeune’s water contamination issue?

A7: For detailed information regarding ongoing lawsuits related to the water contamination issue at Camp Lejeune, it is advisable to seek guidance from experienced attorneys specializing in this area. Additionally, you may visit our website Military-forces.net, which provides comprehensive details about Camp Lejeune, including its history, current status, etc.

Please note that while every effort has been made to provide accurate answers based on available data, it is always advised to consult with professionals such as lawyers or government agencies for specific advice pertaining to your individual situation.

References

  1. https://www.lejeune.marines.mil/about.aspx
  2. https://www.marines.mil/News/News-Display/Article/3230181/ii-marine-expeditionary-force-boards-the-usns-trenton-in-the-mediterranean-sea/
  3. https://www.iimef.marines.mil/