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What Is This Camp Lejeune Lawsuit?

Quick Answer

The Camp Lejeune lawsuit revolves around the exposure of individuals to contaminated water at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune in North Carolina between 1953 and 1987. As a result of the hazardous chemicals in the drinking water, serious health conditions such as cancer, kidney disease, and neurological disorders have been linked to the exposure. Eligible individuals may apply for compensation by meeting specific criteria and may also be eligible for disability and health care benefits provided by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

Introduction

Camp Lejeune, a U.S. Marine Corps Base located in North Carolina, has been at the center of a major water contamination issue that has affected countless individuals and their families. Between August 1, 1953, and December 31, 1987, specific volatile organic compounds (VOCs) seeped into the base’s drinking water supply.

The discovery of this contaminated water in Camp Lejeune led to numerous lawsuits seeking justice for those who were exposed to these hazardous chemicals. As many as one million military personnel and civilian staff members may have been put at risk during their time living or working on the base.

It is crucial to provide information about this ongoing situation so that those affected can understand their rights and seek compensation if they qualify under certain criteria set by law. The purpose of our website is to offer support through comprehensive resources regarding Camp Lejeune’s history with contaminated water and its legal implications.

By shedding light on this issue through accurate information dissemination via our platform – Military-Forces.net – we aim not only to educate but also empower victims who suffered serious health consequences due to exposure at Camp Lejeune.

Eligibility for Compensation

If you or a loved one were exposed to contaminated water at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina between August 1, 1953 and December 31, 1987, you may be eligible for compensation. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) recognizes the serious health consequences that can result from exposure to hazardous chemicals in the drinking water at Camp Lejeune.

Meeting Eligibility Criteria

To apply for a free claim review and potentially receive compensation, it is important to meet certain eligibility criteria set by law. These criteria are designed to ensure that those who have suffered as a result of the contamination are able to seek appropriate relief.

Firstly, individuals must have been diagnosed with one of several specific injuries after their exposure at Camp Lejeune. These qualifying conditions include:

  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Kidney cancer
  • Leukemias (all types)
  • Liver cancer
  • Bladder cancer
  • Non-Hodgkin lymphoma
  • Multiple myeloma
  • End-stage renal disease (kidney disease)
  • Systemic sclerosis/scleroderma
  • Cardiac birth defects
  • Esophageal cancer
  • Male breast cancer
  • Lung cancer (if non-smoker)
  • Miscarriage
  • Hepatic steatosis (fatty liver disease)
  • Female infertility
  • Neurobehavioral effects
  • Non-cardiac birth defects (eye defects, oral clefts, neural tube defects, etc.)
  • Female breast cancer
  • Cervical cancer
  • Hodgkin’s disease
  • Ovarian cancer
  • Prostate cancer
  • Rectal cancer
  • Brain cancer
  • Liver cirrhosis
  • Soft tissue cancer
  • Hypersensitivity skin disorder
  • Aplastic anemia

Alternatively, individuals may qualify if they have been diagnosed with another injury or medical condition not listed above, as long as it can be attributed to the exposure at Camp Lejeune.

It is crucial that your diagnosis aligns with these specified injuries in order to qualify for compensation under current laws regarding the Camp Lejeune lawsuit.

PACT Act and Non-Qualifying Conditions

In addition, the PACT Act (Camp Lejeune Justice Act) allows people who lived or worked on base during the specified time period but do not have a qualifying condition to file for appropriate relief if they were harmed by the exposure. This means that even if your specific injury or medical condition is not listed, you may still be eligible for compensation under this act.

Meeting these eligibility criteria is essential in order to pursue compensation and seek justice for the harm caused by exposure at Camp Lejeune. It’s important to note that lead does not currently have legal representation regarding this matter.

If you believe you meet the necessary requirements, it is recommended that you apply as soon as possible so your claim can be reviewed promptly.

The Discovery of Contaminated Water

In 1982, it was discovered that the drinking water at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune in North Carolina had been contaminated. This contamination occurred between August 1, 1953, and December 31, 1987. The source of the contamination was hazardous chemicals that seeped into the base’s drinking water supply.

The specific volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in the water included trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), benzene, vinyl chloride, and other toxic substances. These chemicals are known to be harmful to human health when ingested or absorbed through skin contact over an extended period.

Exposure to these contaminants put individuals living or working at Camp Lejeune at risk for various serious health consequences. As many as one million military personnel and civilian staff members along with their families may have been exposed during this time frame.

Research has linked exposure to VOCs like TCE and PCE with a range of adverse health effects including:

  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Kidney cancer
  • Leukemias such as acute myeloid leukemia (AML)
  • Liver cancer
  • Bladder cancer
  • Non-Hodgkin lymphoma
  • Multiple myeloma
  • End-stage renal disease leading to kidney failure requiring dialysis or transplantation
  • Systemic sclerosis/scleroderma which is a chronic autoimmune connective tissue disorder affecting blood vessels, skin, joints, etc.
  • Cardiac birth defects
  • Esophageal cancer
  • Cervical cancer
  • Breast cancer
  • Lung cancer
  • Colorectal cancer
  • Liver cirrhosis
  • Hepatic steatosis (fatty liver disease)
  • Miscarriages
  • Hypersensitivity disorders
  • Aplastic anemia

It is crucial to address the issue of contaminated water at Camp Lejeune and provide compensation to those who have been affected. The individuals exposed during their time at the military base deserve justice for the health risks they were unknowingly subjected to. By acknowledging this contamination, we can work towards ensuring that proper support is provided to these victims and their families.

The discovery of contaminated water at Camp Lejeune serves as a reminder of the importance of maintaining safe drinking water supplies in all communities, especially those where our service members live and work. It also highlights the need for accountability when such incidents occur so that appropriate measures are taken promptly.

If you or someone you know has lived or worked at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune between August 1, 1953, and December 31, 1987, and subsequently developed any qualifying injuries mentioned earlier, it may be worth exploring your legal options regarding potential compensation under various programs established by law.

Applying for Compensation

If you or a loved one were exposed to contaminated water at Camp Lejeune and have been diagnosed with one of the qualifying injuries or conditions, you may be eligible for compensation. Here is an overview of the process for applying:

1. Diagnosis Confirmation:

To apply for compensation, it is essential to have a diagnosis of one of the specific injuries or conditions associated with exposure at Camp Lejeune. These include Parkinson’s disease, kidney cancer, leukemias (all types), liver cancer, bladder cancer, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and many others listed in our eligibility criteria.

2. Gather Documentation:

When preparing your claim application, it is important to gather all necessary documentation that supports your case. This includes military records showing your service at Camp Lejeune during the specified period between August 1st, 1953 and December 31st, 1987. Medical records confirming your diagnosis are also crucial evidence required as part of the application process.

3. Choose Your Application Method:

There are several options available when submitting your compensation claim. You can choose from online submission through official channels such as VA.gov website. Mail-in applications are also accepted and can be sent to the proper address. In-person assistance is available at designated locations where trained professionals can guide through the process. Professional assistance from lawyers or advocates may be sought in order to have expert guidance in preparing and submitting your claim. However, beware of fraudulent activities related to Camp LeJeune lawsuits. The VA has clearly mentioned that individuals do not need to hire a lawyer or take legal action to receive benefits related to Camp LeJeune, so it is pivotal to do background research before engaging with any third parties for helping you file a claim.

4. Submitting Your Claim:

Once you have gathered all the necessary documentation and chosen your preferred application method, it is time to submit your claim. Follow the instructions provided by the VA or relevant authorities for online submission, mail-in applications, or in-person assistance centers.

5. Follow-Up and Communication:

After submitting your claim, application processing times may vary. It is important to remain patient and follow up with the VA or relevant authorities if you have not received any updates within a reasonable timeframe. The Camp Lejeune Claims Unit (CLCU) can be contacted for assistance at (757) 241-6020 or via email at CLClaims@us.navy.mil. If you have an attorney representing your case, direct all inquiries regarding the progress of your claim to them.

Remember that filing a lawsuit is not required to receive compensation through this process. The PACT Act (Camp Lejeune Justice Act of 2022) provides appropriate relief for harm caused by exposure without affecting eligibility for VA benefits related to Camp Lejeune.

If you need further guidance on applying for compensation or have specific questions about your situation, it’s recommended that you seek professional advice from qualified legal professionals who are specialized in Camp Lejeune lawsuits. They will help ensure that all your rights are duly protected and assist in your effective representation throughout the complex process of applying for compensation.

VA Benefits and Health Care

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) provides disability and health care benefits to individuals who were exposed to contaminated water at Camp Lejeune. These benefits are aimed at assisting those affected by the exposure in receiving necessary medical treatment and support.

Eligibility for Benefits

Eligibility for these benefits is based on certain criteria set by the VA. Veterans, reservists, and National Guard members must have served at Camp Lejeune or Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) New River for a minimum of 30 days between August 1, 1953, and December 31, 1987. Additionally, they must not have received a dishonorable discharge from their service.

One key aspect of these benefits is that there are specific covered health conditions recognized by the VA as being linked to exposure to chemicals in the drinking water at Camp Lejeune during this period. Some examples include adult leukemia, aplastic anemia and other myelodysplastic syndromes, bladder cancer, kidney cancer, liver cancer, multiple myeloma, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, Parkinson’s disease, among others.

Disability Compensation and Healthcare Services

If an individual meets both the eligibility requirements regarding service duration/location as well as having one or more qualifying presumptive condition(s), they may be eligible for compensation through disability payments provided by the VA. In addition to financial assistance through disability compensation, eligible individuals can also enroll in comprehensive healthcare services offered by the VA.

These healthcare services can help with the diagnosis, treatment, and management of their conditions without requiring copayments for care related to 15 covered health conditions. This includes bladder cancer, breast cancer, kidney cancer, leukemia, lung cancer, and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, among others. The goal is to ensure that those affected have access to timely and appropriate medical treatment even if they do not have private insurance.

Benefits for Family Members

It is important to note that family members who lived at Camp Lejeune during the specified period may also be eligible for health care benefits and reimbursement of their medical expenses related to certain conditions. To qualify, they must provide documentation proving their relationship to a veteran who served at Camp Lejeune and resided on the base for at least 30 days. Additionally, they need to fill out a Camp Lejeune Family Member Program Application and submit medical records confirming diagnosis of one or more covered health conditions.

These VA benefits are designed specifically for individuals affected by exposure to contaminated water while living or working at Camp Lejeune between 1953 and 1987. They aim to provide financial support for compensation of disability as well as high-quality health care services to ensure that those affected receive the care they need without the burden of copayments. Through these benefits, the VA strives to promote healing and recovery for those dealing with the serious consequences of water contamination at Camp Lejeune.

The PACT Act and Camp Lejeune Justice Act

The PACT Act, also known as the Honoring our Promise to Address Comprehensive Toxics (PACT) Act of 2022, includes a significant provision called the Camp Lejeune Justice Act (CLJA). This act was signed into law by President Biden on August 10, 2022. It aims to provide relief for individuals who were exposed to contaminated water at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune between August 1, 1953, and December 31,1987.

Under the CLJA provisions of the PACT Act, those who lived or worked at Camp Lejeune for at least thirty days during this specified period may be eligible to file claims seeking appropriate relief for harm caused by exposure to the contaminated water. These claims can be filed with the Department of Navy through their designated process.

It is important that individuals understand their rights under these acts and are aware of available resources provided by relevant authorities such as filing procedures outlined in detail on official websites like navy.mil/clja/. By familiarizing themselves with these processes and requirements set forth under both acts they will have a better chance of successfully navigating through them while pursuing compensation or other forms of assistance related specifically towards addressing health issues resulting from exposure within affected areas.

Filing a Claim

Filing a claim requires gathering necessary documentation including military records showing service history at Camp LeJeune or MCAS New River along with medical records confirming diagnosis linked directly back either one more presumptive conditions listed earlier which include adult leukemia aplastic anemia bladder cancer kidney cancer liver cancer multiple myeloma non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma Parkinson’s disease among others.

To ensure smooth processing it is recommended that applicants carefully follow instructions provided when submitting required paperwork so there aren’t any delays due incomplete submissions lack supporting evidence etcetera.

Guidance and Resources

For additional guidance throughout this entire process, the Navy provides comprehensive information regarding the CLJA claims process on their official website. This includes access to necessary forms, detailed instructions and procedures for filing a claim, public guidance regarding elective options available under these acts as well as warnings about potential fraud or scams that individuals should be aware of.

It is important to note that the Camp Lejeune Claims Unit (CLCU) will never request money or payment from claimants. Authorized emails sent by them would originate only from email address ending with @us.navy.mil. In case anyone receives suspicious communication claiming affiliation with this unit they are advised forward such messages directly back at CLClaims@us.navy.mil so authenticity can verified before proceeding further.

If there’s any doubt concerning legitimacy phone calls received in connection specifically towards matters related camp lejeune lawsuits it is recommended ask caller provide name position then call number provided verify information given against records held within relevant authorities like Office Judge Advocate General located Washington Navy Yard DC.

For those who have legal representation all inquiries pertaining must directed through attorney representing individual involved rather than contacting navy personnel themselves.

The Camp LeJeune Claims Unit has its office situated at following location: Camp Lejeune Claims Unit, 1322 Patterson Ave SE Suite 3000, Washingon Navy Yard, District Columbia-20374-5066.

In order obtain assistance additional information beyond what already been mentioned here one may reach out via telephone calling (757)-2416020 alternatively send an email over clclaims@navy.us.gov.

Beware of Fraud and Scams

The Camp Lejeune water contamination issue has affected the lives of many individuals, and unfortunately, there are opportunistic scammers who try to take advantage of this situation. It is important for those seeking compensation or benefits related to Camp Lejeune to be aware of potential frauds and scams.

1. Warning about fraudulent activities:

Be cautious when dealing with any individual or organization claiming they can help you obtain VA benefits or file a lawsuit on your behalf. The U.S Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has made it clear that individuals do not need to hire a lawyer or file a lawsuit in order to receive VA benefits related to Camp Lejeune.

2. No need for lawyers:

It’s essential for victims exposed at Camp Lejeune through living or working at the base between August 1, 1953, and December 31, 1987, to know that hiring an attorney does not increase their chances of receiving compensation from the VA nor affect eligibility for these benefits.

3. Reporting suspected fraud:

If you suspect any fraudulent activity regarding claims associated with Camp Lejeune lawsuits:

  • Contact the U.S Department Of Veteran Affairs directly.
  • Report suspicious emails received by forwarding them as attachments along with full headers intact if possible.
    • Authorized emails from CLCU will only come from “CLClaims@us.navy.mil”.

4. Verifying communication channels:

When communicating via email ensure all correspondence comes directly from authorized sources such as “CLClaims@us.navy.mil”. If contacted over the phone, verify caller details including name & position before sharing personal information. If unsure, contact (757)-241-6020 to confirm authenticity. In case representation is being done by an attorney, direct inquiries should be directed towards them.

By staying vigilant against potential scams, fraudulent schemes, and unauthorized entities, you can protect yourself while pursuing rightful compensations under legitimate avenues. The well-being, safety, and security of those affected by the Camp Lejeune water contamination issue are paramount, and it is crucial to be cautious throughout this process.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q1: What is the Camp Lejeune lawsuit?

A1: The Camp Lejeune lawsuit refers to legal action taken by individuals who were exposed to contaminated water at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune in North Carolina between August 1, 1953, and December 31, 1987. This contamination was caused by hazardous chemicals that seeped into the base’s drinking water supply.

Q2: Who can apply for compensation under the Camp Lejeune lawsuits?

A2: Individuals who lived or worked at U.S. Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune during the specified period may be eligible for compensation if they have been diagnosed with one of several specific injuries or conditions linked to exposure to contaminated water. Additionally, those with other types of cancer, serious medical conditions, or injuries not listed may also qualify.

Q3: How do I know if my injury qualifies me for compensation?

A3: The criteria set forth require a diagnosis of certain illnesses such as Parkinson’s disease, kidney cancer, leukemias (all types), liver cancer, bladder cancer, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, multiple myeloma, kidney disease, systemic sclerosis/scleroderma, cardiac birth defects, esophageal cancer, male breast cancer, lung cancer, miscarriage, hepatic steatosis, female infertility, neurobehavioral effects, non-cardiac birth defects, female breast cancer, cervical cancer, ovarian cancer, prostate cancer, rectal cancer, brain cancer, liver cirrhosis, soft tissue cancer, hypersensitivity skin disorder, aplastic anemia, or any type of non-listed cancer/serious condition/injury after exposure at Camp Lejeune.

Q4: Is hiring a lawyer necessary when applying for VA benefits related to Camp Lejeune?

A4: Hiring a lawyer is not required when applying for VA benefits related to Camp Lejeune. Commercials from lawyers or law firms claiming to help individuals obtain these benefits are not affiliated with the VA. To report suspected fraud, individuals can contact the VA directly.

Q5: How do I apply for compensation?

A5: To apply for compensation, you can file a claim online, by mail, in person, or with the help of a trained professional. You will need to provide military records showing your service at Camp Lejeune and medical records confirming your diagnosis of one of the qualifying injuries or conditions.

Q6: What other benefits are available to those affected by Camp Lejeune water contamination?

A6: The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) provides disability and health care benefits to eligible individuals who were exposed to contaminated water at Camp Lejeune. Veterans, reservists, and National Guard members may qualify for disability compensation if they meet certain criteria. They may also be able to enroll in VA healthcare and receive care without copay related to the covered conditions. Family members who lived at Camp Lejeune during the specified period may also be eligible for health care benefits and reimbursement for the costs of certain medical treatments if they have been diagnosed with a covered condition.

Q7: Is there any financial assistance provided under PACT Act?

A7: Pursuant to PACT Act (Camp Lejeune Justice Act), individuals who lived/worked or were exposed at Camp Lejeune for 30 days between August 1st, 1953 – December 31st, 1987 are allowed to claim relief under this act. It does not affect eligibility for VA Benefits related to Camp Lejeune.

Additional Resources

– Provide links/contacts/resources where readers can find more information about applying for compensation, filing claims under CLJA, obtaining legal representation, etc.

References

  1. https://www.va.gov/disability/eligibility/hazardous-materials-exposure/camp-lejeune-water-contamination/
  2. https://www.navy.mil/clja/
  3. https://www.lawsuit-information-center.com/camp-lejeune-water-lawsuit.html