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What Effects Did The Camp Lejeune Contamination Have On Humans?

Quick Answer

The Camp Lejeune water contamination, caused by volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the drinking water, has had significant health effects on residents, civilian workers, and military personnel. Those exposed to the contaminated water may have an increased risk of cancers, adverse birth outcomes, and other health conditions. Eligible individuals may qualify for compensation and benefits under the PACT Act, and veterans and their family members may be eligible for VA benefits related to Camp Lejeune.

Introduction

Camp Lejeune, a U.S. Marine Corps Base located in North Carolina, has been at the center of one of the most significant water contamination incidents in American history. From the 1950s through February 1985, as many as one million military personnel and civilian staff members along with their families were exposed to contaminated drinking water on this base.

The contaminants found in Camp Lejeune’s drinking water included volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), vinyl chloride, benzene, and other harmful substances. These pollutants seeped into two main sources – Tarawa Terrace and Hadnot Point Water Treatment Plants – from various origins like leaking underground storage tanks or industrial area spills.

This prolonged exposure to toxic chemicals had severe health consequences for those living or working at Camp Lejeune during that time period. The potential effects ranged from an increased risk of cancers including kidney cancer, liver cancer bladder cancer; leukemias; non-Hodgkin lymphoma; multiple myeloma; Parkinson’s disease ; cardiac birth defects , esophageal Cancer etc.,to adverse birth outcomes such as miscarriages neurobehavioral effects . It is crucial to provide information about these risks so that individuals who may have been affected can seek appropriate support and compensation if they qualify under specific criteria set by law.

The Contamination and its Causes

The contamination of the drinking water at Camp Lejeune was primarily caused by volatile organic compounds (VOCs). These VOCs, including trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), vinyl chloride, and other contaminants, posed a significant risk to the health of those exposed.

At Camp Lejeune, there were two main water treatment plants that supplied drinking water to residents and personnel – Tarawa Terrace and Hadnot Point. Both these facilities became contaminated due to different sources.

Tarawa Terrace Water Treatment Plant

The Tarawa Terrace water treatment plant was contaminated by PCE. This contaminant originated from waste disposal practices at an off-base dry cleaning firm. Improper handling or disposal methods led to the infiltration of PCE into groundwater sources supplying this particular facility with drinking water.

Hadnot Point Water Treatment Plant

On the other hand, TCE played a major role in contaminating the Hadnot Point Water Treatment Plant along with additional contaminants like PEC benzene degradation products. The exact source for TCE contamination is not clearly identified but it likely came from leaking underground storage tanks or industrial area spills within close proximity to this facility.

This contamination occurred over several decades starting from as early as 1950 until February 1985 when measures were finally taken towards remediation efforts on a base-wide scale.

Health Effects on Humans

The contamination of the drinking water at Camp Lejeune had significant health effects on humans. Those exposed to the contaminated water, whether by living or working at the base, were put at risk and may have suffered serious consequences.

Increased Risk of Cancers

One of the most concerning health risks associated with exposure to contaminated water is an increased risk of various cancers. Studies have shown that individuals who were exposed to the contaminants in Camp Lejeune’s drinking water are more likely to develop kidney cancer, multiple myeloma (a type of bone marrow cancer), and different types of leukemias. These findings highlight how detrimental this contamination was for those affected.

Adverse Birth Outcomes

In addition to an elevated risk for certain cancers, there is evidence suggesting adverse birth outcomes among individuals exposed during pregnancy. Miscarriages and a higher incidence rate of cardiac birth defects have been observed in babies born from mothers who lived or worked at Camp Lejeune while it was experiencing its periodical contamination issues.

Other Adverse Health Effects

Furthermore, other adverse health effects can be attributed to exposure as well. Neurobehavioral effects such as cognitive impairments and developmental delays have been reported among children whose parents were stationed at Camp Lejeune during their pregnancies or early childhood years when they would’ve consumed tap-water regularly.

To better understand these potential impacts on human health due specifically to VOCs found within Camp Lejeune’s waters, studies conducted primarily focused on animals’ responses after being subjected directly into contact with said chemicals alongside workers who experienced occupational exposures over extended periods of time.

Note: The content provided above has not yet undergone review or editing process.

Eligibility for Compensation and Benefits

If you or someone you know has been affected by the Camp Lejeune water contamination, it is important to understand the eligibility criteria for compensation and benefits. The following information will guide you through the process of applying for a free claim review and provide details on specific injuries that qualify for compensation.

Applying for a Free Claim Review

To apply for a free claim review, certain criteria must be met as set by law. One must have been diagnosed with one of the following injuries after exposure at Camp LeJeune:

  1. Parkinson’s disease
  2. Kidney cancer
  3. Leukemias (all types, including myelodysplastic syndromes)
  4. Liver cancer
  5. Bladder cancer
  6. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma
  7. Multiple myeloma
  8. Kidney disease (end-stage renal disease)
  9. Systemic sclerosis / scleroderma
  10. Cardiac birth defects
  11. Esophageal Cancer
  12. Male breast cancer
  13. Lung Cancer (if non-smoker)
  14. Miscarriage
  15. Hepatic Steatosis (Fatty Liver Disease)
  16. Female infertility
  17. Neurobehavioral effects
  18. Non-cardiac birth defects (eye defects, oral clefts, neural tube defects, etc.)
  19. Female breast cancer
  20. Cervical cancer
  21. Hodgkin’s disease
  22. Ovarian cancer
  23. Prostate Cancer
  24. Rectal cancer
  25. Brain Cancer
  26. Liver cirrhosis
  27. Soft Tissue Cancer
  28. Hypersensitivity Skin Disorder
  29. Aplastic anemia

Alternatively, Patient Claimant (PC) might also be eligible if they were diagnosed with another injury not listed above but occurred after exposure at Camp Lejeune. This includes any type of cancer, serious medical condition, or injury not listed above.

It is important to note that lead does not have legal representation for this matter.

Provisions under the PACT Act

In addition to the criteria mentioned above, it is essential to be aware of the provisions under the PACT Act (Camp Lejeune Justice Act of 2022). This act allows individuals who lived, worked, or were exposed at Camp Lejeune for at least 30 days between August 1st, 1953, and December 31st, 1987, to file for appropriate relief due to harm caused by contaminated water. Filing a claim under the PACT Act does not affect eligibility for VA disability or health care benefits.

If you qualify based on these criteria and believe you are eligible for compensation and benefits related to your exposure at Camp Lejeune, it may be necessary to seek professional assistance in navigating through this process.

Filing for Relief and VA Benefits

If you or a loved one were exposed to the contaminated water at Camp Lejeune, it is important to understand your options for seeking relief and accessing benefits. The passage of the PACT Act (Camp Lejeune Justice Act of 2022) allows individuals who lived, worked, or were exposed at Camp Lejeune between August 1, 1953, and December 31, 1987 to file for appropriate relief.

It’s crucial to note that filing for relief under the PACT Act does not affect eligibility for VA benefits. Veterans Affairs provides disability compensation and health care services specifically related to exposure at Camp Lejeune. These benefits are available regardless of whether an individual files a claim under the PACT Act.

We want our readership community members affected by this issue be cautious when considering legal representation or lawsuits in relation with their claims regarding VA benefit entitlements due contamination issues occurred during service time spent on base camp lejurne. Hiring lawyers may not be necessary as veterans can directly apply through established channels within Veteran Affairs without any additional costs involved. The process has been designed keeping ease-of-accessibility in mind so that those eligible receive timely assistance they deserve.

Misleading commercials or claims suggesting otherwise should also be approached cautiously. Veterans must rely on official sources such as government websites like va.gov/disability/eligibility/hazardous-materials-exposure/camp-lejuene-water-contamination/, where accurate information about eligibility criteria, benefit programs, application procedures, etc., is provided.

Frequently Asked Questions

Question 1: Who was affected by the Camp Lejeune water contamination?

Answer:
People living or working at U.S. Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North Carolina were exposed to contaminated drinking water. This includes military personnel, civilian workers, and their families who resided on the base between August 1, 1953, and December 31, 1987.

Question 2: What health conditions are covered for compensation?

Answer:
To be eligible for compensation under the PACT Act (Camp Lejeune Justice Act of 2022), individuals must have been diagnosed with specific injuries after exposure at Camp LeJeune. These include Parkinson’s disease; kidney cancer; leukemias (all types); liver cancer; bladder cancer; non-Hodgkin lymphoma; multiple myeloma; end-stage renal disease (kidney disease); systemic sclerosis/scleroderma;
cardiac birth defects ; esophageal Cancer ; male breast cancer ;
lung Cancer in non-smokers ; miscarriage ;
hepatic steatosis/fatty liver Disease female infertility neurobehavioral effects
non-cardiac birth defects such as eye defects,
oral clefts neural tube defect etc.
female breast cancers cervical cancers Hodgkins diseases ovarian Cancers prostate rectum brain Liver cirrhosis soft tissue Hypersensitivity Skin Disorder Aplastic anemia OR alternatiely PC must have been diagnosed with another Injury after exposure at camp lejene any type of serious medical condition injury not listed above

Question : How can I apply for a free claim review?

Answer:
To apply for a free claim review, you need to meet certain criteria set by law. You should have been diagnosed with one of the specified injuries mentioned earlier that occurred due to exposure at Camp LeJeune. If you believe you qualify based on these criteria, you can contact relevant authorities like The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) or the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). They can provide you with further guidance on how to proceed.

Question : What benefits are available for those affected by the Camp Lejeune water contamination?

Answer:
Veterans, reservists, National Guard members who served at Camp Lejeune between August 1, 1953, and December 31, 1987, may be eligible for disability and health care benefits. The presumptive conditions associated with exposure to contaminated water include adult leukemia; aplastic anemia; bladder cancer; kidney cancer; liver cancer; multiple myeloma; non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma; Parkinson’s disease. Additionally, family members who lived at Camp Lejeune during this time period may also be eligible if they have any of these covered health conditions including breast cancers, lung cancers, miscarriage, neurobehavioral effects, etc.
It is important to note that filing a claim under PACT Act does not affect eligibility for VA disability or healthcare benefits.

Question: How do I file a lawsuit related to the Camp Lejeune water contamination?

Answer:
If you wish to pursue legal action regarding your exposure at Camp Lejeune, it is recommended that you consult with an attorney specializing in environmental law, toxic torts, personal injury claims, as well as military cases.
It should be noted, however, that lead does not currently represent individuals seeking compensation specifically related to Camp Lejeune water contamination.

Question: Where can I find more information about the Camp Lejeune lawsuits and resources?

Answer:
For additional information about the Camp Lejeune water contamination and related lawsuits, you can visit websites like The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), or Military-Forces.net. They provide comprehensive information about eligibility for certain benefits, filing claims, relevant resources, and contact details for supporting organizations.

References

  1. https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/sites/lejeune/background.html
  2. https://www.va.gov/disability/eligibility/hazardous-materials-exposure/camp-lejeune-water-contamination/
  3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK215286/